"Using the chain rule is like peeling an onion. You have to deal with every layer at a time and if it’s too big you’ll start crying."
— Calculus professor (via mathprofessorquotes)
drtyson:

"Last night in midtown Manhattan, Bill Nye @TheScienceGuy teaches me to knot my first-ever Bow Tie. "

drtyson:

"Last night in midtown Manhattan, Bill Nye @TheScienceGuy teaches me to knot my first-ever Bow Tie. "

kidsneedscience:

On July 16, 1969, the Apollo 11 crew blasted off and four days later opened the door of the lunar module and Neil Armstrong stepped out onto the lunar surface.  Armstrong’s radio back to Earth that his was ‘one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind’ became instantly one of the most quoted and known phrases uttered in the name of science.  The Apollo program was started less than a decade earlier with success following success.  Named by then NASA Director Abe Silverstein (who later said it was like naming his baby) after the Ancient Greek god known for knowledge and who was represented as a flaming chariot shooting across the sky.  Hats off today to Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins.  All born in 1930 and still healthy and looking to the skies.  

Thanks also to the flight crew:

SUPPORT CREW

  • Charlie Duke, Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM)
  • Ronald Evans (CAPCOM)
  • Owen K. Garriott (CAPCOM)
  • Don L. Lind (CAPCOM)
  • Ken Mattingly (CAPCOM)
  • Bruce McCandless II (CAPCOM)
  • Harrison Schmitt (CAPCOM)
  • Bill Pogue
  • Jack Swigert

FLIGHT DIRECTORS

  • Cliff Charlesworth (Green Team), launch andEVA
  • Gene Kranz(White Team), lunar landing
  • Glynn Lunney(Black Team), lunar ascent

All images courtesy NASA, used with permission and in the public domain.  Please copy and share!

jtotheizzoe:

I think I’m becoming obsessed with the fluid dynamics of iced coffee and milk.

jtotheizzoe:

I think I’m becoming obsessed with the fluid dynamics of iced coffee and milk.

pennyfornasa:

On June 30, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft, carrying the European Space Agency’s Huygens probe, arrived at Saturn. Today Cassini celebrates 10 years exploring the Saturn system. Originally intended for a four-year primary mission, Cassini has received three extensions allowing the spacecraft to collect 514 GB of science data and 332,000 stunning images of the planet, its rings and moons.Below is a list compiled by NASA of Cassini’s Top 10 discoveries and accomplishments: — The Huygens probe makes first landing on a moon in the outer Solar System (Titan) — Discovery of active, icy plumes on the Saturnian moon Enceladus — Saturn’s rings revealed as active and dynamic — a laboratory for how planets form — Titan revealed as an Earth-like world with rain, rivers, lakes and seas — Studies of Saturn’s great northern storm of 2010-2011 — Studies reveal radio-wave patterns are not tied to Saturn’s interior rotation, as previously thought — Vertical structures in the rings imaged for the first time — Study of prebiotic chemistry on Titan — Mystery of the dual, bright-dark surface of the moon Iapetus solved — First complete view of the north polar hexagon and discovery of giant hurricanes at both of Saturn’s poles Read more: Cassini’s 10 Years At Saturn: http://go.nasa.gov/1o3EzJZ Cassini’s Top 10 Discoveries: http://go.nasa.gov/1m1Skuf  Check out Cassini’s Top Images: http://go.nasa.gov/1veUSF3 Download The Infographic: http://go.nasa.gov/1wxXSyW Image Credit: NASA

pennyfornasa:

On June 30, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft, carrying the European Space Agency’s Huygens probe, arrived at Saturn. Today Cassini celebrates 10 years exploring the Saturn system. Originally intended for a four-year primary mission, Cassini has received three extensions allowing the spacecraft to collect 514 GB of science data and 332,000 stunning images of the planet, its rings and moons.

Below is a list compiled by NASA of Cassini’s Top 10 discoveries and accomplishments:
— The Huygens probe makes first landing on a moon in the outer Solar System (Titan)
— Discovery of active, icy plumes on the Saturnian moon Enceladus
— Saturn’s rings revealed as active and dynamic — a laboratory for how planets form
— Titan revealed as an Earth-like world with rain, rivers, lakes and seas
— Studies of Saturn’s great northern storm of 2010-2011
— Studies reveal radio-wave patterns are not tied to Saturn’s interior rotation, as previously thought
— Vertical structures in the rings imaged for the first time
— Study of prebiotic chemistry on Titan
— Mystery of the dual, bright-dark surface of the moon Iapetus solved
— First complete view of the north polar hexagon and discovery of giant hurricanes at both of Saturn’s poles

Read more:
Cassini’s 10 Years At Saturn: http://go.nasa.gov/1o3EzJZ
Cassini’s Top 10 Discoveries: http://go.nasa.gov/1m1Skuf
Check out Cassini’s Top Images: http://go.nasa.gov/1veUSF3
Download The Infographic: http://go.nasa.gov/1wxXSyW

Image Credit: NASA

laikas-owner:

poodlepants:

I was all set to be snarky about this, but I think Neil did well enough on his own.

*Infomercial voice* with such wondrous hits such as “Baby, you’re starlight”, “You make my heart go supernova (duet with Bill Nye)”, and that super great single, “Stars in your eyes”.

laikas-owner:

poodlepants:

I was all set to be snarky about this, but I think Neil did well enough on his own.

*Infomercial voice* with such wondrous hits such as “Baby, you’re starlight”, “You make my heart go supernova (duet with Bill Nye)”, and that super great single, “Stars in your eyes”.

A Celebration of Carl Sagan - Library of Congress

Speakers:

James H. Billington (0:26 - 4:45)

Seth McFarlane (5:00 - 13:26)

Christopher H. Chyba: “Science and Hope” (14:00 - 21:24)

Ralph J. Cicerone: “From the Faint Early Sun Paradox to the Bright Star of Science Communication” (21:52 - 29:18)

John P. Holdren: “Creating a Science Savvy Citizenry” (29:42 - 36: 28)

Jonathan I. Lunine: “Letter from a Hero” (36:56 - 44:22)

David Morrison:  ”Carl Sagan: The People’s Astronomer” (47:33 - 57:55)

Bill Nye: “Carl Sagan Saved the World, and Me Along with It” (58:22 - 1:07:05)

Carolyn Porco: “Carl, This One’s for You” (1:07:34 - 1:17:17)

Steven Soter: “Carl Sagan as a Candle in the Dark” (1:17:54 - 1:24:24)

Kip S. Thorne: “Carl Sagan’s Impact on Me: From Wormholes to Floaters to Science Communication” (1:28:00 - 1:39:15)

Neil deGrasse Tyson: “Carl on my Mind” (1:39:43 - 1:50:58)

Ann Druyan: “A Way for the Universe to Know Itself” (1:51:29 - 2:04:16)

"In high school I got all this guidance, like ‘Why do you want to take calculus? You’re just going to get married and have babies.’ Or ‘What do you mean you want to take a physics course? You’re just going to be a housewife.’"

kelsium:

You can tell a girl she’s smart her whole life, encourage her in school, buy her a chemistry set, send her to math camp, help her apply for college scholarships in STEM fields, and she’s still eventually going to walk into a classroom, a lab, or a job interview and have some man dismiss her existence, deny her funding, pass her over for a promotion, or take credit for her work. How about you work on getting those assholes out of power and quit telling me not to call girls pretty.

the bf gave me the original cosmos record and the dvd set of new cosmos for my birthday

i mean i guess this is about as sweet as anyone could get

oplik:

Sagittarius in Blue Canyon, CA (6/27)
Exposure time: 30 seconds, f/3.5

oplik:

Sagittarius in Blue Canyon, CA (6/27)

Exposure time: 30 seconds, f/3.5

afro-dominicano:

richard dawkins is a shining example of the fact that just because you have some scientifically minded ideas about how nature works and can write books or make shows about how beautiful the intricacies of the world is doesn’t mean you’re immune to the ignorance, stupidity and downright maliciousness that comes with being a white male blind to the system he thrives in. like not even all that science and understanding of evolution helped the homie out on that one..

rememberingafuture asked:
"So are you still in the process of becoming an astronomer?"

do I get partial credit for still trying?